Research Papers

A significant number of research papers have highlighted how important gender equality is at many levels, for companies’ revenue as well as for countries’ economic growth. Equileap aims to transform the workplace for women, using the power of knowledge, investments and donations.

Harvard Business Review / The Other Dividend

The Other Dividend (August 2018), by Paul Gompers and Silpa Kovvali

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Veris Wealth Partners / Gender lens investing

Gender Lens Investing: Bending the Arc of Finance for Women and Girls (Fall 2018), It took 25 years for the first USD 1 billion to be invested in gender lens investments. The second billion dollars took 12 months. Given the rapid expansion of the gender lens investment ecosystem, the future looks bright for those committed to bending the arc of finance for women and girls.

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MSCI

Women on boards and the human capital connection (March 2018), Studies have asked whether having multiple women on a board of directors has translated into better financial performance. There is some research suggesting that this may be the case.1 But does this question go to the heart of the matter?

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World Economic Forum

The Global Gender Gap Report (2017), Based on the results of this year, progress on achieving gender parity in education has been comparatively high, while economic gender parity remains elusive: a remaining gender gap of about 5% compared to 41%, respectively.

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MSCI

The Tipping Point : Women on Boards and Financial Performance  (Dec. 2016), A growing body of research shows that having three women on a corporate board represents a “tipping point” in terms of influence, which is reflected in financial performance. Our analysis from last year looked at a snapshot of global companies in 2015 with strong female leadership, finding that they enjoyed a Return on Equity of 10.1% per year versus 7.4% for those without such leadership.

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Peterson Institute for International Economics

Is Gender Diversity Profitable? (February 2016), The results suggest that the presence of women in corporate leadership positions may improve firm performance significantly. The impact is greatest for female executive shares, followed by female board shares; the presence of female CEOs has no noticeable effect. This pattern underscores the importance of creating a pipeline of female managers and not simply getting women to the very top.

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United Nations Women

Facts and Figures: Economic Empowerment (multiple sources,) When more women work, economies grow. An increase in female labour force participation—or a reduction in the gap between women’s and men’s labour force participation—results in faster economic growth.

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Barbara MaheResearch Papers